Analyzing the movie, “Primer”

Have you ever watched the file, “Primer?” For those who had never heard of this movie, Primer is a 2004 film about time travel. Although the plot of the movie involves time travel, it has a lot of twist that makes the movie more interesting with each passing scene. Within the structure, the film addresses some factors that support the main points of the movie. For example, the types of montage presented in the film, the cinematography strategies in terms of color, movement and tonal range used, and how successful with its explorations on the concept of time travel.

In this film, Primer showed evidence of using at least 2 montages. One of the montages that were used is. Rhythmic montage. Rhythmic Montage is by using different frames of the film to keep the pace of the film at a certain speed. This montage can be seen in the scene when Aaron and Abe were trying to make the experiment for their time travel theory. For example, the camera was changing the viewpoints of Aaron and Abe talking. This shows that it brings tension into the future result if the experiment will be a success. Another montage that was used in this film was Metric Montage. Metric Montage is the editing that follows a certain number of frames, cutting the next shot no what is happening within the image. This montage can be seen when Aaron and Abe were in the process of experimenting themselves in the box. For example, in this scene the camera kept focusing on Aaron and Abe like they were hiding for something or being in an uncontrollable condition. For this scene, it can be said that this montage was able to show them have this uncomfortable sensation while committing the experiment on themselves.

 

In addition to Primer having evidence of montages, it also has evidence to the cinematography strategies in terms of color, movement and tonal range used. One strategy that the film had was the camera movement to how Aaron and Abe felt from doing the experiment on each other. For instance, Aaron and Abe tell each other what the feeling was when during the 15 minutes of the experiment, while the camera was focusing on a bunch of wires to looking at objects in the dark. This would bring tension to how the darkness and silence in the room made they fell like the time was going slower that it really is. Another strategy that the movie had was the color alteration in the scene when Aaron and Abe were talking. For instance, the color of the screen change to a lighter setting when Aaron and Abe we talking about paradoxes as soon as the narrator were finished talking. This color shift shows that story is going into a later time period that is most closely towards evening time.

 

Finally, in my opinion, even with the montage use and strategies for color, movement and tonal rang, the movie wasn’t really able to be successful with its explorations on the concept of time travel. One way I consider this is because they didn’t really show that much evidence to being a double to the past version of Aaron or Abe. Illustrating this, they talked more on how the double did a different action the past version didn’t do. The movie didn’t show the past version and the double together in the same area at the same time. Instead of mostly talking about it, the creators of this movie could have had an actor’s double to show more tension that theory is more possible to happen.

 

To reillustrate, the movie Primer is associated with the theory of time travel. This movie shows evidence of using different montages, strategies with colors, movement and tonal range, and how successful the movie was with the explorations on the concept of time travel. Even though the movie was a 1 hour and 17 minutes long, it was quite entertaining. With the movie showing how it showed time travel made me want to ask questions like, “how the movie will end?” or “will the past version and the double see each other?” I wonder movies were able to capture the theory of

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